analysis of the Female Middle Class Emigration Society
Read Online
Share

analysis of the Female Middle Class Emigration Society thesis submitted for the Middlesex Polytechnic Graduate Research Diploma in Humanities by Sally Davis

  • 512 Want to read
  • ·
  • 58 Currently reading

Published by [Middlesex Polytechnic] in [London] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Female Middle Class Emigration Society.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Study of the work of the Society, which operated between 1862 and 1865, and specialised in helping women able towork as governesses.

StatementSally Davis.
ContributionsMiddlesex Polytechnic. Faculty of Humanities.
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 170 leaves ;
Number of Pages170
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13934007M

Download analysis of the Female Middle Class Emigration Society

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

The Female Middle Class Emigration Society () was founded in The population explosion in England during the first half of the nineteenth century led government policy to encourage large scale emigration, while simultaneous concerns over the number of 'superfluous', unmarried women led to projects to stimulate female emigration.   Female Middle Class Emigration in the Nineteenth Century Ma | nonfictioness In the census exposed the bald truth that there was an excess of , women in Britain. Not only this, but the statistics also showed that two-thirds of women aged 20 to 24 years old and one third of women aged 24 to 35 were unmarried. The problem of writing a social history of the Victorian middle-class spinster has been aggravated by the paucity of appropriate sources. This study is based on the records of contemporary female emigration societies and Colonial Office emigration projects, and on . Starting with an analysis of the surplus of women question in the national censuses and in the press, this book then explores the philanthropic nature of the organisations under study (the Female Middle Class Emigration Society, the Women’s Emigration Society, the British Women’s Emigration Association, and the Church Emigration Society).

The Female Emigration Societies Within a Changing Society: Periodisation The Model and Plurality of Female Emigration Societies The Women's Emigration Society ( ) and the Church Emigration Society ( ): Class and Gender Subaltern Roles Knowledge Is Power Surplus Women and the `Eye of Power'   —Maria Rye, founder of the Female Middle Class Emigration Society. To mark the book's launch, Patricia sat down for a chat with Kathryn Favelle, the Library’s Director of Community Engagement. Patricia Clark in the National Library Bookshop with copies of Great Expectations: Emigrant Governesses in Colonial Australia, Society’) and the solitary female emigrant (in the letters of the ‘Female Middle Class Emigration Society’ and Anthony Trollope’s John Caldigate), Myers shows the portability of domesticity and the performance of amnesia to create possibilities for maintenance and transformation, despite a lingering anxiety that class and gender. Concerned primarily with the plight of single, middle-class women, Rye and Lewin saw in emigration an alternative plot to the tragic denouement in poverty and spinsterhood that awaited a large.

Starting with an analysis of the surplus of women question in the national censuses and in the press, this book then explores the philanthropic nature of the organisations under study (the Female Middle Class Emigration Society, the Women's Emigration Society, the British Women's Emigration Association, and the Church Emigration Society).Format: Pasta dura.   'Of the studies on middle-class emigration, Hammerton's () is the most comprehensive though Eriksen (), Buckley () and Van Helton () all cover relevant aspects of single female emigration to America, Canada, and South Africa. For other work on Australian middle class emigrants, see Clarke () and Sales (). Buy British Female Emigration Societies and the New World, 1st ed. by Ruiz, Marie (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on .   Credit: Between and the somewhat improbably titled Female Middle Class Emigration Society aided English governesses who went to the colonies by providing loans and arranging contacts.